Adoption of the ULIN Treaty

On January 7, 2011, in Archives, Public Notices, by Staff

PUBLIC NOTICE

TO THE ENROLLED CITIZENS OF THE NANTICOKE LENNI-LENAPE

TRIBAL NATION AND OTHER INTERESTED PERSONS

 

In November 2007, the United League of Indigenous Nations met during the National Congress of American Indian Annual Conference.  Our tribal delegate was authorized to officially witness this second treaty signing, adding new tribes.  NCAI member Tribes were encouraged to adopt the treaty and participate in the United League and our tribe and the confederation leadership were briefed on its importance.  This organization has worked to further the interest of Indigenous People all over the world and played a critical part in the promotion of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.  In November 2010, our tribe was represented at another meeting of the United League.  With the heightened interest of the Obama Administration in the United Nations Declaration over the past year, it was determined that it was important to promote our own tribal sovereignty and support the United League.  This does not commit our tribe to any financial requirement. The following resolution was unanimously adopted by the tribal council on December 6th, 2010.

TRIBAL RESOLUTION TR-2010-12-06

ADOPTION OF THE

UNITED LEAGUE OF INDIGENOUS NATIONS TREATY

Whereas the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Nation is a sovereign American Indian Tribe made up of Nanticoke and Lenape people who descend from the historically documented tribal families, whose seat of government has remained in our homeland since ancient times; and,

Whereas the Constitution of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Nation asserts our inherent right to self determination, freely determine our political status, freely pursue our economic, social, religious and cultural development, and determine our membership, without external interference; and,

Whereas we acknowledge these same rights and principles to be inherent among other peoples, nations and governments throughout the world, recognizing their sovereignty and pledging to maintain relations with those peoples, nations, and governments who acknowledge those same fundamental human rights and principles, and who recognize the sovereignty of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Nation; and,

Whereas the signers of the United League of Indigenous Nations Treaty of August 1, 2007, pledges mutual recognition of our inherent rights and power to govern ourselves and our ancestral lands and traditional territories; and,

Whereas the principles, goals, and mutual covenants of the United League of Indigenous Nations Treaty are consistent with the values, principles, and goals of our tribal government.

Be It Resolved that the government of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Nation adopts the United League of Indigenous Nations Treaty and authorizes our tribal delegate to sign the treaty on behalf of our tribe and be the point of contact for official treaty matters; and,

Be It Resolved that the government of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Nation shall cooperate with the United League of Indigenous Nations in assembling data, information, knowledge and research needed to effectively address substantial issues of common concern; and,

Be It Resolved that government of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Nation will coordinate statements of policy and matters regarding this Treaty to be disseminated to the media and shall endeavor to participate in reviews and strategy planning sessions of the United League of Indigenous Nations.

Certification

This resolution was adopted at a regular meeting of the Tribal Council on December 6th, 2010.

 

United League of Indigenous Nations

On October 14, 2010, in Archives, by Staff

In November 2007, the United League of Indigenous Nations met during the National Congress of American Indian Annual Conference.  Our tribal delegate was authorized to officially witness this second treaty signing, adding new tribes.  NCAI member Tribes were encouraged to adopt the treaty and participate in the United League and our tribe and the confederation leadership were briefed on its importance.  This organization has worked to further the interest of Indigenous People all over the world and played a critical part in the promotion of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.  In November 2010, our tribe was represented at another meeting of the United League.  With the heightened interest of the Obama Administration in the United Nations Declaration over the past year, it was determined that it was important to promote our own tribal sovereignty and support the United League.  View the Public Notices section of this website to view the resolution.

 

New Secure Tribal Citizen’s Cards

On October 14, 2010, in Archives, Public Notices, by Staff

The Tribal Council has approved a new and more secure tribal citizen’s photo-identification card. While the older paper photo and non-photo cards will continue to be valid for tribal use, the new secure card will be phased in as the new standard for the photo identification cards, beginning this fall.

The New Card has modern Security Enhancements

How is this card “more secure?” The new durable plastic photo-identification card has both background and foreground images, a bar code, and a holographic element. Along with the information that has been on the paper cards, the new plastic card will also include the address of the cardholder. Not only does it look great, but it also is far more difficult to make unauthorized copies.

Those who have the older paper photo and non-photo tribal cards don’t need to worry… those cards will stay valid until the expiration date on each card (the expiration date is only pertaining to the card and has nothing to do with tribal citizenship- which does not expire).  Expiration dates are now a part of the tribal citizenship cards to encourage the broader acceptance of tribal cards as a valid form of identification.  Also, tribal citizens are not required to change to this card – the tribal council has decided that the older style non-photo tribal cards will still be issued at no cost and will be valid for tribal use.

The new secure card costs $15, with seniors (55+) and youth (under 18) only being charged $13.  More information on how to order these cards will be available at tribal meetings.  2013Tribal Identification Card Form

 

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